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MISSOURI LAW - 2017  **NOTE - MOST STATES HAVE BETTER CHILD SAFETY PROTECTION LAWS** IT IS HIGHLY RECOMMENDED TO HAVE YOUR CHILD REAR FACING, BACK SEAT, UNTIL AT LEAST (MINIMUM) OF 2 YEARS OLD!!

Missouri law requires all drivers and front-seat passengers to wear seat belts. If the driver holds an intermediate driver license, all passengers must wear seat belts.

While safety belts offer excellent protection for adults, they are not designed to keep children safe in the event of a motor vehicle accident. Missouri law states:

  • Children should stay in a rear-facing child safety seat until 1 year old and 20 lbs.
  • A child less than 4 years old or weighing under 40 lbs. must be secured in a child passenger restraint system appropriate for the child.
  • A child 4 through 7 years old, who also weighs at least 40 lbs. must be in a child passenger restraint system or booster seat until they are at least 80 lbs or 4 feet 9 inches tall.
  • Children 8 years old and older or at least 80 lbs, or more than 4 feet 9 inches, may ride fastened in a seatbelt.
  • All children under 16 years old must be properly secured in a vehicle.

The fine for violating Missouri's child safety law is $50 plus court costs. Child safety seat requirements do not apply to children who are being transported in a school bus or public carrier for hire.

If you have questions about Missouri's child safety restraint laws or wish to schedule a checkup to ensure your car seat is installed correctly, contact the Missouri Department of Transportation at (800) 800-2358. 


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Sleep Information

The National Sleep Foundation (NSF), along with a multi-disciplinary expert panel, issued its new recommendations for appropriate sleep durations. The report recommends wider appropriate sleep ranges for most age groups. The results are published in Sleep Health: The Journal of the National Sleep Foundation . The National Sleep Foundation convened experts from sleep, anatomy and physiology, as well as pediatrics, neurology, gerontology and gynecology to reach a consensus from the broadest range of scientific disciplines. The panel revised the recommended sleep ranges for all six children and teen age groups. A summary of the new recommendations includes:

  • Newborns (0-3 months): Sleep range narrowed to 14-17 hours each day (previously it was 12-18)
  • Infants (4-11 months): Sleep range widened two hours to 12-15 hours (previously it was 14-15)
  • Toddlers (1-2 years): Sleep range widened by one hour to 11-14 hours (previously it was 12-14)
  • Preschoolers (3-5): Sleep range widened by one hour to 10-13 hours (previously it was 11-13)
  • School age children (6-13): Sleep range widened by one hour to 9-11 hours (previously it was 10-11)
  • Teenagers (14-17): Sleep range widened by one hour to 8-10 hours (previously it was 8.5-9.5)
  • Younger adults (18-25): Sleep range is 7-9 hours (new age category)

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Summit Pediatrics
3171 NE Carnegie Dr Ste A
Lee's Summit, MO 64064

   
 P) 816.525.2800     F) 816.525.4077

 


    Office Hours:      Mon-Fri 7:30am-5:00pm

Quick Sick Clinic:     *call ahead Mon-Fri   7:40-11:00am  2:00-4:00pm

 

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